Māori Language Week 2010

  Some definitions  Basic greetings  Say goodbye  Formal Occasions
  Signing a letter or e mail  Mihi to start meeting Mihi at a formal powhiri - tangata whenua  Mihi at a formal powhiri – manuhiri
  Tauparapara  Opening karakia  Closing karakia  Karakia to bless food
  Other Resources   


 

This year's theme is Manaakitanga Hospitality. 

Have a look at the Te Taura Whiri i Te Reo Mäori site for more in formation Here 

sandwich
Here's a little test - Kai for tina
click view slide show

 practice actions
Preserving our reo here - click view slide show

Ahakoa he iti, he pounamu
Although it is small, it is precious

Even if you only know few words of Mäori they are still precious.

Körero ia rä, ia rä, ia rä
Speak them everyday
He kapu tī māu? – do you want a cup of tea?
Ae, he kapu tī maku – yes I want a cup of tea.

       Coffee – kāwhe
       Sugar – huka
       Milk - miraka


 Here are very simple examples of basic speeches and greetings. It is important that you talk to people from your own area to understand the different dialects, words and customs for your own region.

Some definitions 
 

Mihi or mihimihi

speech 
Whaikōreromaking speeches 
Mihi whakatauspeeches of welcome (less formal welcome than a powhiri) 
Pōwhirimore formal type of welcome (usually includes some or all of the following protocols - karanga, formal speeches from tangata whenua and manuhiri,  karakia, hongi hariru and kai whakanoa) 
Karakia, inoiPrayer
WaiataSong
WhakataukiProverb or saying sometimes used to begin a speech
TauparaparaChant, verse to start a speech
PoroporoakīFarewell

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Basic greetings  

You can use these in verbal speeches or in e mails, letters or memos
Tēnā koegreeting to one person (formal)
Tēnā kōruagreeting to two people (formal)
Tēnā koutougreeting to three or more people (formal)
Kia orahello (informal), actual meaning is may you be well
Kia ora kōruaHello to two people (informal)
Kia or Koutou Kia ora Koutou Katoa hello to three or more people (informal)Hello to you all
He mihi nui kia koeWarm greeting to you (one person)
Ngā mihi nui kia kōruaWarm greeting to you two
Ngā mihi nui kia koutou katoaWarm greetings to you all
E ngā mātāwaka o te motu, tēnā koutou katoaAll groups throughout the land, greetings
E ngā mana, e ngā reo e ngā karangarangatanga maha, tēnā koutouAll authorjties, all voices, all the many alliances and affiliations, greetings
Often you will hear a speaker repeat a phrase three times for example tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa. This is done to emphasis the greeting or acknowledgement.

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Ways to say goodbye

 
You can use these in verbal speeches or in e mails, letters or memos
- Kāti ake i konei 
- Ka nui (pea) tēnei
- Heoi ano 
Enough said.
All can be used to signify you have said enough and will finish your message
(Nō reira) , Noho ora mai rā(therefore), look after yourself
Goodbye for nowHei kona mai
Goodbye and thank you- Hei kona mai i roto i ngā mihi
- Hei kona mai me ngā mihi
Many thanksAku mihi nui ki a koe
Until I hear from you againKia rongo kōrero anō au i a koe
Let me know your responseMāu mea rā tiaki i a koe
Ending a letter (or an e mail) 
 
Yours faithfullyNāku, nā (one person signing)
Yours sincerelyNāku noa, nā (one person signing)
 Nā māua noa, nā (two people signing
 Nā mātou noa, nā (more than two people signing
Yours sincerely/humblyNāku iti nei, nā
Yours with thanksNāku i runga i aku mihi ki a koe

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Mihi for starting a meeting

 
Note: Use  “koe for one person”, “kōrua for two people ” or “koutou for more than two people”
E ngā iwi i huihui nei,
Nau mai, haere mai ki tēnei hui
Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou 
To all people here today
Welcome, welcome to this meeting
Greetings, greetings, greetings to you all
Ngā mihi nui kia koutou katoa
Nau mai, haere mai ki tēnei hui 
Warm greetings to you all
Welcome to this meeting
 
Formal Occassions 
 
At more formal occasions it is usual to add different dimensions to your speech. This could include some or all of the following:
·         An acknowledgement to God and or a karakia
·         A tauparapara or whakatauki to start the speech
·         Acknowledgement to those who are deceased
·         Acknowledgements to the meeting house, mountains and rivers
·         Acknowledgements to all people represented
·         Acknowledgements to the reason why the meeting is being held
·         Your whakapapa or information about who you are
·         Concluding remarks

It would be appropriate for you to seek guidance from someone in your area or attend classes to learn about these aspects of making speeches.   Following are some simple examples.

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Mihi at a formal pōwhiri  if you are with the tangata whenua (home people)  
 
E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e rau rangatira mā
Tēnā, koutou katoa
E ngā mate, haere, haere, haere atu rā
E ngā iwi i huihui nei, tēnā koutou

E ngā manuhiri, nau mai haere mai ki tēnei hui
Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa      
To all authorities, all languages and all chiefly people represented here, Greetings to you all
To those who have passed on farewell,
To all people gathered here today, greetings
To the visitors, welcome to this gathering 
Greetings, greetings, greetings to you all 
Ko (insert your name) tōku ingoa
Nō (insert the name of the place where you come from) ahau
My name is (insert your name)
I come from (insert the place you come from) 
 Make your speech in English then conclude with the following 
No reira,
Note: you may also want to include a whakatauki here that supports your speech, then conclude with
Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa  
Therefore,     


 
Greetings, greetings, greetings to you all.When used at the end of a speech tēnā koutou also means I acknowledge you all.

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 Mihi at a formal powhiri – if you are with the manuhiri (the visitors)  
 
Use if going onto a marae
Te whare e tu nei tēnā koe

Te marae ki waho nei tēnā koe

E ngā mate haere haere haere atu rā
E ngā iwi i huihui nei
Tēnā koutou tēnā koutou tēnā koutou katoa
 
To the house that stand here, greetings
To the marae that lies outside, greetings
To those who have passed on farewell
To all peple gathered here
Greetings, greetings, greetings to you all
Ko (insert your name) tōku ingoa
Nō (insert the name of the place where you come from)
My name is (insert your name)
I come from (insert the place you come from) 
 Make your speech in English then conclude with the following 
No reira,
(Note: you may also want to include a whakatauki here that supports your speech, then conclude with) 
Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa  
Therefore,     



Greetings, greetings, greetings to you all.When used at the end of a speech tēnā koutou also means I acknowledge you all.

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 Tauparapara 
If you wish to use a tauparapara to begin your speech you should talk to people in your area or attend classes to see what is appropriate for you to use, there are some that should only be used for certain occasions.  The tauparapara is usually followed by the words ‘tihei mauriora’ – behold the brief of life (signifying that the speaker is about to make his speech). Some people will just say ‘tihei mauriora’ which signifies they are about to stand to make their speech.  
 
 Opening karakia 
Note: this is a simple opening karakia that asks the Atua for their support and assistance to help people get their work done. 
E te Atua
Manaakitia tēnei hui
Awhinatia mātou i roto i o mātou mahi
Ko tō Wairua Tapu tō mātou Ariki
Amene 
Lord
Support us at this meeting
Guide us in the work we are doing
Through your spirit
Amen
E te Atua
Manaakitia tēnei hui
Awhinatia mātou i roto i o mātou mahi
Amene 
Lord
Bless this meeting
Support us in the work we are doing
Amen

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 Closing karakia  
Note: this is a simple closing karakia that thanks the Atua for their support and assistance in helping people do their work.
E te Atua
E whakawhetai ana mātou mo ōu manaakitanga i tēnei hui
Awhinatia mātou i tēnei rā
Ko tō Wairua Tapu tō mātou Ariki
Amene 
Lord
Thank you for your support and guidance during this meeting.
Care for us this day
Through your spirit
Amen
E te Atua
E whakawhetai ana mātou mo ōu manaakitanga i tēnei hui
Awhinatia mātou i tēnei rā.
Amene 
Lord
Thank you for your support and guidance during this meeting.
Care for us this day.
Amen

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 Grace to bless food 
 
E Te Atua
Whakapaingia ēnei kai
Hei oranga mō mātou tinana
Ko tō Wairua Tapu, tō mātou Ariki
Amene
Lord
Bless this food
For the wellbeing of our bodies
Through your spirit
Amen
E Te Atua
Whakapaingia ēnei kai
Hei oranga mō mātou tinana
Amene
Lord
Bless this food
For the wellbeing of our bodies
Amen

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 Other Resources 
Te Taurawhiri The Māori Language Commisison site for learning about the Māori Language and making speeches
http://www.korero.maori.nz/  

This intranet site has a detailed description of different stages of a mihi. It also
gives you a list of books that are useful resources.
http://www.maori.org.nz/tikanga  

This site has a lot of information and links to other sites about Māori language, protocols, designs, arts and crafts.http://www.maori.org.nz/  

The language of oratory, whaikōrero speechmaking
http://english.unitecnology.ac.nz/resources/units/oratory/maori_notes

Page last updated 20 Feb 2012