Marae History

Kataraina Te Urumahue Te Katene and Haami Horouta Emery

Kataraina was born in the year 1880 at Tapuaekura to Hona Whakataki Te Katene of Ngati Rongomai and Aneta Irihana Rewiri of Ngati Te Rangiunuora; she was the eldest of three siblings, one brother and two sisters; Petera, Anipatene and Maata.
Children of HONA and ANETA

Kataraina Te Urumahue

Kataraina Te Urumahue

Anipatene

Antipatene

Petera

Petera

Maata

Maata

Parents of KATARAINA, ANTIPATENE, PETERA and MAATA

Hona Whakataki Te Katene

Hona Whakataki Te Katene

Aneta Irihana Te Katene-nee Rewiri

Aneta Irihana Te Katene-nee Rewiri

Haami Horouta Emery was born to Waimarama Analoch Emery of Ngati Kahu and Samuel Hoera Joy of Ngati Mahuta, Ngati Maniapoto and Ngati Pukeko in 1885 in a small settlement in Te Awamutu. Our Koroua had no schooling, he left home at 12 to find his fortunes and to work in gum fields up North. He could not read or write and he could only speak Maori. He had a sister-Waitauhi who married Kereama Tenoki of Fielding.

Hera Waitauhi Kereama-nee Emery

Hera Waitauhi Kereama-nee Emery

Haami Horouta Emery

Haami Horouta Emery

Parents of HAAMI

Samuel Hoera Joy

Samuel Hoera Joy

Waimarama Analoch Emery

Waimarama Analoch Emery


In 1903 Kataraina and Haami married. Together they had six children. With Haami's determination to succeed in life for his whanau and his ever supporting wife, they ran and owned many successful businesses. Just to name a few, they had General Stores, a Sawmill, Passenger Launch Boat, Dry Stock and Dairy Farming Units, Taxi Services, Bus Transportation, even Race Horses which were winners too.
With the abundant tautoko he got from Kataraina and her sisters Haami was taught and was able to sign his name and many a times they done all his paper work for him. He became a man of Mana and a pillar to his community and whanau. As he helped many people not just his own whanau hapu/iwi but other people of different ethnics as well.

Kataraina and Haami married

Kataraina and Haami Emery at Moose Lodge, Rotoiti

House

A cowshed used to stand where Kuia and Koroua built their house at Tuarae and the whare still remains there today, it is still known to us as the Big House, it is there that the Kuia would always have an open door policy to all, no matter who or where you were from, everyone was welcomed. She would make sure her whanau and even sometimes many unexpected guest feel so at home that they became her extended whanau, she had the tendency to adopt them as many didn't want to leave. She was a woman of tino aroha, her compassion was second to none, she had the most humble gentile personality one could ask for blended with her soft kind and generous nature her approach towards people whether it be Hou kainga or Manuhiri made her the hostess of the mostest. I guess you could say that today we would call her hospitality a Bed and Breakfast, but without having to pay.

Now because our Koroua Haami had many resources that the whanau could use and more so have for free, he and the Kuia would donate many materials such as wood from the sawmill and usage of vehicles and the Koroua's knowledge and manpower and his time to build up the community housing around the Rotoiti district. The Koroua helped with the building of Rakeiao at Tapuaekura and when it was all done and finished whanau from there rejected him, which really saddened the Kuia's heart. This sort of thing happened again when Uenuku Mai Rarotonga was brought over from Maketu; it was not erected up immediately once here, the Whare was to lie where the rugby fields are known now as Emery Park for many years. It was the desire of Kataraina's maternal aunt, Rangipawa Taranui better known as Kui Te Whatu that she asked Haami to help with the erecting of Uenuku Mai Rarotonga to where it stands today at Punawhakareia, and because of the much love Haami had for the whanau he immediately set to work on this exciting project. Unfortunately for him when the project was over he was again rejected, which of course naturally saddened Kataraina's heart once more. This is where we get the evolving of our Marae at Taurua.

Rangipawa Taranui nee Rewiri aka kui Te Whatu

Rangipawa Taranui nee Rewiri aka kui Te Whatu

Beginnings of Te Rangiunuora me Te Wetenga-a-uru

TAURUA MARAE

Christmas 1955 the Emery Whanau held a Reunion at Tuarae (The Big House) and knowing of Kataraina's dreams and aspirations the Koroua approached Haare Serjeant a nephew to the Kuia and her sisters, and a son in-law to himself and Kataraina he asked for some land, of course Haare asked what for? The Koro proceeded to explain to Haare why, then without any hesitation Haare took Koro and Ramon Skerrett (son in-law to Haare) on a walk up the hill to where the marae is now, and proposed and offered the most excellent site.

Emery Whanau - Christmas 1955 at Tuarae, Rotoiti

Emery Whanau 

Back Left to Right: George, William and Simon

Front Left to right: Raiha Serjeant, Kataraina, Haami, Maraea Hunia

Mereanna Nicholas 

Daughter of Kataraina and Haami Mereana Nicholas

Pre-deceased the 1955

Family Reunion

Now Haare being the biggest shareholder in this block thought that this would be the most opportune time to give something back to his and Raiha's ever growing whanau and the future one's forthcoming to have their own right of being Tangata Whenua tuturu also. So with their unselfish generosity Kataraina and her sisters; Anipatene and Maata, gave bigheartedly their inherited shares in this land for the purpose of our Marae. And because of the Koroua's aroha and his manaaki toward Kuia Te Whatu, she left Haami her shares in this specific property in her will which was indeed perfect.

Haare Te Tokotu Serjeant

Haare Te Tokotu Serjeant

Te Katene Sisters

Te Katene Sisters

Back: Maata Ramanui

Front:Kataraina and Anipatene

Most of the money the Kuia's were getting from their land dividends and their pension benefit went towards the funding as did the profits from the few remaining businesses the Koroua still owned. The Koroua rallied his grown up children and mokopuna together to help with funding too, plus other many money making ventures, such as cards (flag 500) etc. Had to mention that last part as the Kuia's were known to play a good hand or two. Although, the Kuia's may have played cards, Kataraina and her sisters were staunch pillars of the Catholic Faith.

Children and many whanaunga of Haami and Kataraina toiled endlessly; they poured their heart and soul immensely towards the erection of such an aspiring and vigorous task of our Marae. The Tohunga Whakairo (Master Carvers) were Haami and Kataraina's son George Emery; Kelly Kereama (Fielding) a nephew of Haami, Thompson Tahuriorangi (Mourea), and Te Kaka Niao (Te Teko) and a number of learners. Many sleepless nights were lost especially toward the conclusion of this project.

TOHUNGA WHAKAIRO

Thompson, George and Kelly

Thompson, George and Kelly

Te Kaka

Te Kaka

It was said that on our Kuia Kataraina's death bed she vowed that the Koroua will never have to feel the hurt and pain he became subjected to by her kin and so it was her wish to have a Marae Complex of some sort built especially for the Koroua. If something was to happen to him he would have somewhere to be and even if that meant being in a Marquee on that whenua. Sadly our Kuia Kataraina passed away before the completion of the Marae on the 21st July 1959 and her tangi was held at Punawhakareia Marae.

Kataraina Emery

Kataraina Emery 1880-1959

Maryanne Wichman nee Serjeant

Maryanne Wichman nee Serjeant

On the 5th November in 1960 the Whare Tupuna, Te Rangiunuora and Wharekai Te Wetenga-a-uru were officially opened by the Prime Minister the Right Honourable Walter Nash and Elizabeth Maryanne Mihikiteao Serjeant, puhi of Te Rangiunuora hapu.

Following the opening came many happy occasions, with that came the sorrowful ones too but that's another chapter.
An excerpt for the Official Opening Book:
Before her Maker, whom she dearly loved, called her behind the "Veil" she became alive to the fact that her own descendants had grown large in numbers and she there resolved to dedicate the rest of her years in planning the building of Te Rangiunuora whose influence would one day reach out, embrace, and unite her children and their children and her many loved tribes in the days to come.

Taurua Marae

Marae

Story re-told by Irihana Tuhiwai

Assisted by Martha Fox, The Emery, Serjeant and Skerrett Whanau

Page last updated 5 Aug 2011